WMCW focuses on land, lodging and labour

At its General Assembly in Avila, Spain from 15-21 July, the World Movement of Christian Workers (WMCW) focused on the theme “Land, Housing and Work for a decent life”.

In the final statement from the assembly, the movement committed itself to “offering our work and our struggles to all the workers of the world, at local, regional and global level.”

“This is how we will realize our evangelization mission. We intend to adapt the organization of the WMCW to better respond to this challenge,” the assembly concluded.

The final statement continued:

We are committed to :

1. Strengthen our militant lifestyle, our formation and our revision of life in accordance with our faith in Jesus Christ, with the Gospel and the social doctrine of the Church.

2. Promote the relationship between movements and the workers pastoral: we need to be a voice in the Church and a voice in the world of work, with particular attention to the most excluded and precarious people.

3. Analyze the regional situation of workers in order to create dynamics that denounce situations of vulnerability of rights and protect the dignity of the person. Promote equal opportunities for men and women in all areas, also within our organizations. Contribute to the training of young Christian workers.

4. Encourage alliances with other major actors at local and regional level who share our approach to decent work and the construction of the common good.

5. To promote solidarity and common action with popular movements, during World Meetings, in a dialogue with the Pope, and at specific meetings by zone or region.

6. Continue to invite all Christian Workers movements to take part to the International Day of Decent Work (7 October), together with the world trade union movement and the International Labour Organization.

7. Propose at local and regional level a confluence of Catholic-inspired organizations, and in doing so try to launch an international initiative of the Church in favour of decent work.

8. Demand decent work for all.

9. Urge states to guarantee a social wage or citizen’s income that will help avoid the rejection of millions of people if access to decent work is not guaranteed.

The General Assembly also elected a new International Bureau to lead its work for the next four years.

SOURCE

Final Statement of the International Seminar and General Assembly of WMCW – Ávila (Spain) 2017 (WMCW)

Philippines YCW/YCS leaders warn Duterte

Filipino youth organisations, including local YCW and YCS leaders, have warned President Rodrigo Duterte not to sabotage the anti-martial law protests or use them as a “pretext” to declare nationwide martial law, GMA Network News reports.

In a statement, the groups led by Anakbayan said that doing so would hasten his “fascist” regime’s downfall.

“By churning out ridiculous gags – from declaring September 21 a ‘national day of protest’ to challenging protesters to ‘occupy EDSA’, Duterte hopes to sabotage protests and discourage people from joining. The Filipino youth and people will prove him wrong,” said Anakbayan national chairperson Vencer Crisostomo.

“Mr. Duterte, if you think declaring nationwide martial law will make you escape accountability for all your accumulated crimes against the Filipino people and continue your tyranny, then you are dead wrong. It is better if you just step down,” he added.

“Mr. Duterte, we are warning you. Your current rush towards outright fascist rule and threats of using the full force of the police and military apparatus to quell dissent is only bound to fuel more resistance and hasten your downfall.”

Students and youth groups from the country’s biggest universities will participate in the massive collective action set on September 21, the 45th anniversary of Ferdinand Marcos’ declaration of martial law in 1972.

Anakbayan said protesters in Metro Manila on Wednesday will march towards the gates of Malacañang Palace and stage a program at 1:00 p.m.

Signatories included Student Catholic Action (Philippines YCS) and Errol Alonzo on behalf of the YCW.

Youth groups to Duterte: Don’t use Sept. 21 protests as excuse to impose martial law (GMA Network News)

PHOTO

Presidential Communications Operations Office / Wikipedia

Young people share views on Synod

Last week, the Vatican has hosted a seminar on today’s youth in preparation for next year’s Synod of Bishops’ gathering on “Young people, faith and vocational discernment,” La Croix International reports

A group of 21 teens and young adults took part in last week’s invitation-only even, where they joined in discussions and made concrete proposals for the Synod.

Stepping through the doors of the conference room, visitors may have been surprised to find that gray hairs were in the minority at a seminar organized by the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops last week.

Participants did not hesitate to challenge the academic presenters at the event or to raise the stakes by freely expressing their views during the debates.

In fact, they even protested when the presentations of the experts exceeded the time limit and ate into their precious discussion time.They also criticized the Vatican survey addressed to young people which was considered to be too long or poorly translated.

“The pope asked us to ‘make chaos,’ that’s precisely what we’re doing,” said Lucas Barboza with a smile.

“You have galvanized us,” said Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, the Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops, in his concluding remarks.

He graciously welcomed the young people’s critiques, including on the content of the seminar, which failed to address subjects such as personal relationships and sexuality, or the lack of non-European representation among the young people invited (only one representative was from Africa).

FULL STORY

Young people make waves at Synod meeting (La Croix International)

Catholic youth have something to say – and the Church is listening (Catholic News Agency)

 

IYCS leader Richard Apeh (left) with other delegates

Parramatta YCW recruits

The Parramatta YCW) is looking to employ a Youth Engagement Officer (YEO) whose work “will focus on engaging and forming young people in individual and collective actions that will transform their lives and the communities they live and work in.”

The role is a 2 year fixed contract position for 38 hours a week Monday – Sunday, according to an advertisement placed on Ethical Jobs.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Be experienced in recruiting and working with young people in short and long term projects, develop strategic plans of action and coordinate events.
  • Understand the issues facing young workers and be able to engage young adults in community based activities and actions addressing these social and workplace issues.
  • Establish teams of leaders for the ongoing development and growth of YCW’s activities and actions
  • Facilitate the growth of faith-values among young adults through a process of action-reflection in small groups and complementary training
  • Have some experience planning and writing grant applications.
  • Have an understanding of how to coordinate social media campaigns
  • The YEO will work closely with and report to the PYCW Leaders Team.

Essential criteria:

  • Demonstrated ability to recruit and engage young adults (18 – 30) in community activities and action.
  • Demonstrated ability to establish and develop teams of volunteers, including individual leadership skills and commitment to social change.
  • Demonstrated commitment to working with vulnerable young people and a belief in social justice principles.
  • An ability and commitment to working within a Christian faith based organisation while being inclusive of those from other beliefs.
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills, including an ability to work across diverse cultures and backgrounds.
    NSW Driver’s Licence.

SOURCE

Youth Engagement Officer (Parramatta YCW/Ethical Jobs)

Vale Kevin Dynon, YCW and VFL footballer

Kevin Dynon, one of the first YCW footballers to make the grade as an AFL footballer, died on 8 September 2017.

Recruited from Kensington YCW, Kevin joined North Melbourne VFL (now AFL) side in 1943 at the age of seventeen.

“A former captain, club Hall of Fame member and Victoria representative, Kevin Dynon will be remembered as a true North Melbourne great,” the NMFC website says.

“Tall for a centreman of his time (179cm) and very solid (85kg), Dynon’s dynamic mix of strength and skill was a feature of the North sides that made the finals in 1945, 1949, 1950 and 1954,” an excerpt from The Shinboners book reads.

“After missing three seasons from 1944-46 becaues of the war, Dynon returned to North as skipper in 1947 – “the youngest leader in club history at the time at just 21,” the club says.

“Demoted after winning just four games at the helm, he remained unperturbed and continued to play at a high standard helping North to a preliminary final in 1949 and a Grand Final in 1950,” the NMFC site continues.

In 1952 and 1953 he was re-appointed captain and went on to play 149 games across 12 seasons.

Kevin died on 8 September, which is regarded as the foundation day of the Australian YCW, which was in turn chosen to honour the birthday of Mary, Jesus’ mother.

SOURCE

Vale Kevin Dynon (North Melbourne Football Club)

Kevin Dynon (Wikipedia)

PHOTO

Herald Sun

110,000 respond to Vatican youth survey

More than 110,000 young people from around the world have responded to an online survey posted by the Vatican secretariat for the Synod on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment in 2018.

“In the roughly three months it has been online, more than 110,000 young people have responded to the questionnaire,” says Synod secretary-general Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri. “It’s a significant number considering the absolute novelty of the initiative, and one that is bound to increase in the coming months.”

The response rate, he said, “demonstrates the great desire of young people to have their say.”

Meanwhile, twenty people under the age of 35, along with 70 theologians, priests and academics are meeting from September 11-15 as part of the preparatory process for the 2018 Synod of Bishops on “young people, faith and vocational discernment,” Catholic News Service reports.

Several young people participating in the seminar urged the Vatican and the bishops themselves to be opening to listening to youths talk and ask questions about love, sex and sexuality.

Therese Hargot, who leads sex education programs at Catholic schools in Paris, told the gathering September 13, “it’s surprising we are looking at politics, economics, etc., but not at sexuality and affectivity, which are very important topics for young people.”

Ashleigh Green, an Australian delegate to the seminar, said that going around Australia in preparation for the synod she found that “a lot of young people feel like they cannot talk about issues that matter to them” in most church settings.

However, Cardinal Baldisseri told the seminar that Pope Francis wants the synod in October 2018 to not just be about young people, but with young people, assuring they have a voice.

FULL STORY

Don’t be embarrassed to talk about sex, youths tell Vatican officials (Catholic News Service)

Synod website

Movements pioneered alternative seminary formation

Fr Bruno Cazin, vicar general of Lille, France, is also a medical doctor

France’s University Formation Group (GFU), which allows young men to combine secular and seminary studies, is celebrating its 50th anniversary, La Croix International reports.

This is a made-to-measure pathway for students who wish to become priests but without abandoning their existing studies. It was launched fifty years ago this year under the auspices of France’s Mission Ouvrière (Worker Mission) and the Catholic Action movements.

“At that time in 1967, the number of seminarians was in free fall and the bishops had decided to close down the minor seminaries,” recalls Fr Emmanuel Goulard, superior of the GFU seminary.

“The seminary was therefore founded as a place of discernment and initial formation for students while they continued their university studies,” he explains.

This was a specifically French innovation that has continued to develop over the course of the last half century.

There were around one hundred such students during the early 1980s when Lille vicar general, Fr Bruno Cazin, who is also a medical doctor, took this path.

Now there are seventeen GFU students across France with four or five new students beginning the program each year.

Fr Cazin, a specialist in hematology [the study and treatment of blood], is convinced that the pathway continues to offer great value.

“It was while working in a hospital that I really came to understand Christ and the Gospel and that is why I stayed,” he explains.

“The GFU pathway also allows students or young professionals to test their vocation by sharing the daily life of people.”

To sum up, an extra muros seminarian fully combines seminary and student life until, after completing their engineering, philosophy or other secular studies, begin the classical theological studies leading to the priesthood.

FULL STORY

Alternative seminary formation celebrates golden jubilee (La Croix International)

Séminaristes et étudiants, deux vies en une (La Croix)

PHOTO

Diocese of Amiens

Asociación Cardijn works with young people and immigrants

The Association Cardijn was created in Cádiz, Spain, in 1993 with the aim of working with the most disadvantaged social groups, particularly young people from poor areas and immigrants.

Its purposes are:

  • Integral promotion of all people from working and popular environments.
  • Awareness, information, orientation, formation and promotion of young people, especially from poor and working class areas
  • Awareness, information, orientation, counseling, reception, training and promotion of migrants – immigrants and migrants – and especially those in situations of greater vulnerability.
  • Information, orientation, training and promotion work and professional, as well as assistance in finding employment both domestic and foreign.
  • Collaboration with the various public or private administrations that intervene or are interested for the same purposes.

In 2005 it joined the CONSORCIO “SECRETARIADOS DE MIGRACIONES”, which is part of a state action and represented in four Autonomous Communities: Madrid, Valencia, Andalusia and Ceuta.

Its three main areas of work are young people, immigrants and employment.

Website

http://www.asociacioncardijn.org/

Wurzburg partners with Tanzania

Founded in 2002, the Joseph Cardijn Foundation and the CAJ (YCW) movement in the German Diocese of Würzburg are raising funds for the Uvikambi Centre including a carpentry school and a tailoring workshop in Mbinga in Tanzania. The centre includes guest rooms, a school of carpentry, meeting rooms, a restaurant and a contact point for local people.

“The focus of the funding has always been on the projects of the partnership with the Uvikambi, the Catholic Youth Association in Ming- dia, the partner province of the diocese of Würzburg,” says Andrea Karl, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Joseph Cardijn Foundation.

As well as financing the salaries of local teachers, the Foundation and the Wurzburg CAJ supply toolkits to apprentices who complete their training.

“Young people who have completed their apprenticeship there have already received a toolbox or a sewing machine, depending on their training,” Andrea added.

“As well as in the city of Mbinga, we have been able to launch further projects through our activities in smaller municipalities in the diocese.

“These include a fishing project on the Malawi Sea, for example, which has been running for almost 20 years.”

The Uvikambi local group initiated the fishing project, to improve the lives of fishermen on the Malawi Sea.

“People, for example, are buying nets together to improve living conditions in the Community.” The nets were initially too big, so small fish could not be caught. This is why the Foundation co-financed new networks.

“In 2006 I went to Tanzania for the first time. I wanted to know about the situation there and the development policy situation,” explains Andreal. The effects of globalization were already becoming visible.

“Many big companies are fishing on the Malawi Sea. And there is a huge area on which brown coal is mined. Tanzania has many valuable raw materials in the soil,” Andrea noted.

With a donations coming to around 2000 to 2500 euros per year, there is already a lot going on in Tanzania.

“We pay attention to making donations meaningfully and sustainably, and we are thus in a constant reflection process,” Andrea explained.

The project organisers also evaluate the local contribution to the project.

A donation of 50 euros provides for the purchase of a fishing net, while 100 euros is enough for the construction of a dug-out boat.

For further information, please contact:

Joseph Cardijn Foundation, Treibgasse 26, 63739 Aschaffenburg, Germany

Bank account: Ligabank Würzburg, IBAN DE30750903000003011240, BIC GENODEF1M05

Website: www.cardijn-stiftung.de

SOURCE

A future for the people of Mbinga (Diocese of Wurzburg)